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Novinium News: March 2017

March 31, 2017

M.I.C.

We have a long history of introducing new devices that assist us in improving the efficacy and efficiency of our rejuvenation services. The very first injection elbows were introduced about three decades ago. About one decade ago Novinium introduced Injection Adapters (IAs) that had several key advantages over injection elbows. The IAs were designed specifically to support Sustained Pressure Rejuvenation (SPR). SPR is safer and provides substantially higher reliability than the older Unsustained Pressure Rejuvenation (UPR) process and is even superior to our “improved” UPR process that we call iUPR. Sustaining pressure and keeping the silane injection fluid away from the injection component are the two main advantages of SPR over UPR and iUPR. Our advancements in injection application devices continues with the Modular Injection Component, or MIC, which is referred to by annunciating each letter, unlike the “Mick” that goes with Jagger.Later this year the MIC (pictured below) will be commercially introduced and it combines the best features of the old injection elbows and the newer IAs. Inside the MIC are subcomponents that trace their ancestry to the IA. A valved IA or VIA is swaged onto a cable end, just as a standard IA is, but as the name implies, there is a special, very tiny valve that is included in the VIA. The valve is actuated when injection personnel insert or remove injection caps on the MIC. Thus, like an IA, the VIA supports sustained pressure rejuvenation, but there is no need to insert a plug when the injection process is complete, because a valve automatically closes and sustains the internal pressure. The MIC can be used for iUPR injections too, so it enjoys great operational flexibility.

Glen Bertini, CEO, Novinium
View PDF The MIC was co-developed with our strategic partner, Richards Manufacturing Company and is actually only the first step along a long planned development path. The various patent pending inventions included in the MIC will be migrated to a new kind of injection elbow in 2018. The illustration of the next page shows the applicability of the current three choices for SPR and iUPR injection methods along with applicability to live-front and dead-front terminations.  [dt_fancy_image image_id=”14879″ width=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1491002799578{margin-right: 10px !important;}”] Dead-front vs Live-front
Dead-front devices are easily recognized, because of their black rubber exteriors. The black rubber is semi-conductive and attached to ground to provide a level of shielding. Live-front devices have no shielding and are easy to recognize as one can see the metallic conductors. Live-front devices are inherently less safe, because they lack the exterior shielding.

Injection Component Selection

[dt_fancy_image image_id=”14882″ width=”full” align=”center” css=”.vc_custom_1491002910258{margin-left: 10px !important;}”] The MIC is the only injection component that can be used for any combination of SPR and iUPR and for both live-front and dead-front termination. The MIC can even be installed adjacent to a splice.

There are other advantages to the MIC besides its application flexibility. Because it mates with standard components the MIC requires only a small number of sizes to accommodate a dizzying number of termination configurations. The MIC can be mated with load-break and non-load-break elbows, 15 and 25kV elbows, elbows with and without capacitive test points. Instead of dozens of elbows to stock, just two or three MICs are flexible enough to cover over 90% of our applications.

The introduction of the MIC also expands our strategic supply of injection devices. Virtually all of the ‘393 injection Elbows come from a single manufacturer and as a consequence a substantial portion of the value our Novinium products and services is included in ‘393 Elbows. The introduction of a new injection termination choice will provide Novinium with improved leverage during pricing negotiations.

Engineering’s Don Songras and James Steele have led much of the development work on the MIC with support from many others. The first MIC will likely be deployed this fall. Forever advancing; never resting on laurels.

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Be kind.
Be masterful.